Who We Work With

We empower women, men and children to end hunger for themselves and their communities for good.

We believe hungry people themselves are the key to ending hunger.

Once empowered, there is no one more determined, more willing and more capable to end their own hunger. We work to unleash their vision, commitment and leadership so they can lift themselves and their families above the poverty line.

Razia, Bangladesh

“Every woman should be skilled and economically self-reliant… Otherwise, the problems of women could never be solved…”

Rita, Ghana

“I worked with the teachers, sensitising the school children on the effects and the harms teenage pregnancy can do to them.”

Rejeya, Bangladesh

“Now I do not pass the night without food and my other family members can eat full meals at night.”

Featured

Razia, Bangladesh

“Every woman should be skilled and economically self-reliant… Otherwise, the problems of women could never be solved…”

Rita, Ghana

“I worked with the teachers, sensitising the school children on the effects and the harms teenage pregnancy can do to them.”

Rejeya, Bangladesh

“Now I do not pass the night without food and my other family members can eat full meals at night.”

Razia, Bangladesh

“Every woman should be skilled and economically self-reliant… Otherwise, the problems of women could never be solved…”

Rita, Ghana

“I worked with the teachers, sensitising the school children on the effects and the harms teenage pregnancy can do to them.”

Rejeya, Bangladesh

“Now I do not pass the night without food and my other family members can eat full meals at night.”

Click on the names below to read about some of our inspiring partners in Africa, South Asia, and Latin America.

Guiré Salimata, Burkina Faso

Today, Guiré Salimata finds herself busy running a successful restaurant and providing for her five children. In 2013, before Guiré began participating in the Boulkon Epicentre Microfinance Programme with The Hunger Project-Burkina Faso, her...

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Awa Ndiaye, Senegal

    Awa Ndiaye is 37 years old. She lives with her husband (a construction worker), his three daughters (thirteen, nine and three years) and her five-year-old son. Mrs Ndiaye joined the The Hunger Project’s Microfinance Programme (MFP) in Senegal in...

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Meher Nazmun, Bangladesh

Meher Nazmun, known popularly as Tisha to her friends and family, is 21 years old and lives in Munshipara, Rangpur District in Bangladesh. As she walked to and from her college, Tisha was troubled at seeing children from the nearby slums on the...

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Margarita, Mexico

    My name is Margarita, I am a young Tzotzil woman. I am 19 years old, and I live in the community of Vallalemó in San Andrés Larráinzar Chiapas in Mexico. My husband´s name is Mariano; he is 23 years old and is from my community as well. We have...

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Manowara Afroz Saleha, Bangladesh

From childhood, Saleha dreamt of being a teacher, but her father’s sudden death when she was eight years old, and a time of economic crisis in Bangladesh, meant that alone, like many women and girls, Saleha and her mother encountered serious...

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Fátima Filimonecossa, Mozambique

Fátima Filimonecossa, is 55-years-old, married and the mother of three sons. She was born in Gaza Province and she lives live in Zuza village with her family. She is a student in adult literacy in a class of 32 students (29 women and three men)....

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Dina Amartey, Ghana

Since joining The Hunger Project’s Women’s Empowerment Program and becoming a trained animator in Ghana, Dina has expanded her farm, started a new business and has positively affected the lives of women in her community. My name is Dina Amartey; I...

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Tasly, Bangladesh

Tasly was born in 1976 in the Baroidanga village of Satgambug Union in Bangladesh. Despite her limited means, she was very successful in school and received a Higher Secondary Certificate (high school). She dreamed of completing higher education,...

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Elisabeth Obubuafo, Ghana

    Elisabeth is making the impossible possible. Elisabeth Obubuafo is a shining example of an empowered woman, running multiple businesses, sending her children to school and providing food for her community. It was not always this way. Elisabeth...

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Photography credits: Banner image – Johannes Ode